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Values and Ethics of Leadership

Values and Ethics of Leadership Philosophy Statement
          According to the National Staff Development Council (2010), "principals, superintendents, and other key personnel that serve as instructional leaders, artfully combine pressure and support to achieve school and district goals, engage parents and other caretakers in the education of their children, and establish partnerships with key community institutions that promote the welfare of all students" (n.p.).  Educational leaders need to demonstrate values and ethics of leadership in order to skillfully balance these demands and determine what is in the best interest of learners.  The successful completion of the following can assist educational leaders in this task:  demonstrate knowledge about the history and foundations of education, apply the Minnesota Code of Ethics for School Administrators, and engage in ongoing professional development activities.          
          Educational leaders must be familiar with the history and foundations of the field of education.  This knowledge will help them understand how the role of education has evolved over time and prepare for where the field is heading in the future.  Zirkel (2001) examined the court cases have shaped U.S. education.  The rulings from these Supreme Court cases covered a wide variety of topics (i.e., equality in education, freedom of expression, discipline and school safety, the complex relationship between religion and government in education).  As an educational leader, I believe that it is important to have background knowledge in these landmark decisions as they continue to impact the practices of K-12 education and subsequent educational court cases.
          Effective educational leaders "are clear about their own values and beliefs and the effects these values and beliefs have on others and on the achievement of organizational goals" (National Staff Development Council, 2010, n.p.).  I believe that educational leaders need to ground their values and beliefs in the code of ethics that applies to their field.  As a future administrator, I have familiarized myself with the Minnesota Code of Ethics for School Administrators and have practiced applying the code during my field experience.  By upholding these ethical standards, I will be one step closer to ensuring demonstration of the values and ethics of leadership necessary to lead my organization toward its mission.
          Additional education and training is a basic need for all educators to remain competent professionals.  This need for ongoing staff development applies to administrators as well. Administrators should be committed to establishing "policies and organizational structures that support ongoing professional learning and continuous improvement" (National Staff Development Council, 2010, n.p.).  Educational leaders should tune into the needs of their school, identify strengths and weaknesses, and try to obtain training and education for themselves and other staff that match up with the mission of the organization.
          The key to effective leadership is a direct link between a leader's values and ethics and the actual attitudes and behavior demonstrated by the leader within their organization.  This link helps promote stability, a shared purpose, and trust to organization employees.  By being knowledgeable about the history and foundations of education, the code of ethics that shapes administration, and the ongoing need for staff development to reach organizational goals, I believe I will be on the right track to demonstrating ethical practice as an educational leader.   

References
National Staff Development Council (2010). Leadership. Retrieved March 8, 2010, from: http://www.nsdc.org/standards/leadership.cfm

Zierkel, P.A. (2001). Decisions that have shaped U.S. education. Educational Leadership, December 2001/January 2002, 6-12.

K.  Values and Ethics of Leadership: Core Competency

  1. demonstrate understanding of the role of education in a democratic society;
  2. demonstrate understanding of and model democratic value systems, ethics, and moral leadership;
  3. demonstrate the ability to balance complex community demands in the best interest of learners; and
  4. help learners grow and develop as caring, informed citizens;
  5. demonstrate understanding and application of the Minnesota Board of School Administrators Code of Ethics for Administrators.

Artifacts

The following artifacts demonstrate my competency in the area of values and ethics of leadership:

This artifact demonstrates my ability to help learners grow and develop as caring, informed citizens (K4).  As part of the Go WILD program, students are taught behavioral expectations within their daily advisement period.  I created the attached lesson plan to teach students about Wisdom, one of our four behavioral expectations.  In addition to learning about the importance of demonstrating the Go WILD expectations in the school setting, the lessons also encourage students to develop behaviors related to becoming caring, informed citizens.

This artifact demonstrates my understanding and application of the Minnesota Board of School Administrators Code of Ethics for Administrators (K5). During my field experience, I had the opportunity to review and apply the code of ethics. I have familiarized myself with its contents, as well as the statutory enforcement of the code, complaints, investigation, and hearing; complaints handled by the board; and different enforcement procedures.

 
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